I really wish you hadn’t eaten that. Part four, what anyone with pets should know about managing a toxic exposure.

Close supervision and understanding what can be a toxin, will prevent most pets from accidental poisoning. However, I know quite a few dog and cat individuals in our neighborhood who seem hell-bent on living dangerously, and in this post, I will try to summarize the best way to proceed when circumstances beyond our control lead to a toxic exposure or poisoning.

I am not proud to admit that my current canine companion, Tyson, required no fewer than 4 emergency trips to Animal Kind for eating something toxic in his first 6 months of living with me. I still wonder if ASPCA Poison Control has flagged me in their database for calling them so many times about my own dog. Continue…

I really wish you hadn’t eaten that. Part one, toxicities from foods and metals.

Keeping our creature friends from eating something that they shouldn’t is almost impossible. Whether my cat is stealing sautéed shrimp off the table at supper time or my dog is discovered in the pantry with his head in a box of cereal, my household is certainly not free from this menace. Thankfully it is rare that these brief indiscretions prove dangerous. Rolling your eyes and cleaning up the residue is generally the appropriate response. However, there are some important exceptions to this rule and every house contains a few things that would be quite dangerous to a cat or dog if ingested. In this entry I will attempt to touch on some of these common household hazards and what any of us should be ready to do in this type of emergency. Continue…