When Flexibility Takes a Toll: The Not-So-Obvious Dangers of Retractable Leashes

Retractable leashes are convenient but pose safety risks too When you think about your dog’s leash, are you inconvenienced by its sheer lack of complication, or are you rather pleased by the inherent simplicity? It’s amazing to think that something as streamlined as a 6-foot leash requires improvement, but then again the concept of retractable leashes has a place in modern dog ownership. This great debate will continue, but we should all be aware of the hidden dangers associated with retractable leashes.

Is This a Controversy?

Many dog owners are absolutely devoted to retractable leashes, and when used properly, they can be highly convenient. They shouldn’t be used when walking along busy roads, through pedestrian traffic, or near any other potential hazards, like construction sites. They should never be attached to a choke collar. Continue…

Lyme Disease and Pets, What Is the Deal?

Lyme Disease and Pets, What Is the Deal?

Female deer tick

Lyme disease is a potentially serious infection caused by the bacteria Borelia burgedoferi and transmitted by the deer tick or black legged tick, Ixodes scapularis.  In this article, I will attempt to explain the differences and similarities between this disease in people and in dogs, the best preventative measures, and testing and treatment of veterinary patients.

The Northeast United States has the highest incidence of Lyme disease. The Center for Disease Control has collected a great deal of information on the condition as it affects people. The veterinary community also has paid special attention to this infection in recent years, developing a much better understanding of the disease, tests to help us identify affected patients, and preventative measures including highly effective tick control and vaccinations against the bacteria.

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What is your diagnosis?

What is your diagnosis?

Presentation

Little Bear

Little Bear is a 7 1/2 year old, male neutered, mixed breed dog. On November 8, 20**, he presented to Animal Kind Veterinary Hospital for decreased activity and dramatically decreased appetite of one week’s duration. His family also reported that he seemed to be drinking more water than usual, had an episode of vomiting three days prior, and was passing less stool than usual. There was no history of travel, dietary indiscretion, or known toxin exposure.
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